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Annual Appeal

At the end of each calendar year, Newton Schools Foundation holds an Annual Appeal.  This fundraising initiative provides an avenue for community members who value the Newton Public Schools—including past NSF supporters, Newton Public Schools alumni, and parents of Newton Public Schools graduates—to continue to support the important work of NSF.

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2016-17 Annual Appeal

Thank you, Newton community! Your generosity has made a difference for thousands of Newton students. Last year alone, you funded a multitude of new and enhanced educational opportunities, including the successful pilot of the Generation Citizen initiative that Lily described. How successful was Generation Citizen?  95 percent of the participating students said they believed that contacting public officials can have an impact on policy and/or budget decisions, up from 77 percent before the program. 95 percent of students expect to vote in elections compared to 85 percent prior to the program.This year, financial support of Newton Schools Foundation from community members like you will build on these promising results for children in the Newton Public Schools:

  • 780 tweens and teens have broader access to social and emotional supports through NSF-funded middle school advisory programs.  65 middle school teachers have been trained in Responsive Classroom strategies.
     
  • 36 sophomores and juniors are taking exciting new interdisciplinary courses in STEAM through the DaVinci Program at Newton South, which was piloted last year.  At Newton North, 20 students per year are enrolled in an interdisciplinary Science and Society elective.
     
  • More low-income students and students of color are achieving in advanced mathematics as 110 middle and high school students participate in the Calculus Project. An additional 30 rising seventh graders will enroll this summer.
     
  • 1,760 elementary school students have deepened their writing skills led by teachers trained by the NSF-funded Summer Writing Institute; this year middle school students are receiving similarly enhanced writing instruction.

Your partnership with us will continue the good work of the Newton Public Schools to pilot and launch initiatives that promote academic achievement, social/emotional wellness and equity for Newton students across all grades K-12 in our 21 elementary, middle and high schools.  Without your support, these programs would not be possible.

The programs below are those that NSF is currently funding or has funded through Annual Appeal contributions:

Elementary School

  •  The Summer Writing Institute provides teachers with comprehensive professional development so they can implement a new writing curriculum that helps students become proficient writers for the information age. The new curriculum has students writing earlier, more often and in more dynamic ways. With additional funding, the Summer Writing Institute will expand into the 6th grade, where students will continue to build on the skills and lessons they learned in elementary school.
     
  • Responsive Classroom Training is a nationally used, research- and evidence-based way of teaching that improves students’ social and academic skills and raises teachers’ instructional quality. NSF-supported teacher training provided educators with tools to build and sustain an authentic culture of kindness and genuine care, allowing students to take risks, both social and academically.
     
  •  Instrumental Music Pilot Progam at Lincoln-Eliot: The longstanding practice in Newton is to encourage instrumental music students (parents) in grades 5 through 12 to enroll in private lessons. NSF funds will bring professional instrumental clinicians into Lincoln-Eliot Elementary School to support the ensemble music program and give individualized instruction to students who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity for private lessons. With the potential for expansion into other schools, this enriching new program will help to better educate the whole child.

Middle School

  • The Calculus Project is designed to increase the number of low-income African American and Hispanic American students who enroll in and successfully complete calculus in high school. An ambitious effort to narrow the achievement gap in mathematics, the program is comprised of summer enrichment courses and school-year support for students beginning in 7th grade.  It is modeled after a similar and very successful initiative in Brookline. Additional NSF funding will enable the program to expand into the high schools.
  • Sustainable Energy Generation: Wind Turbines and Blade Design is an innovative hands-on engineering curriculum that  teaches students how to generate energy through new blade design for wind turbines. Designed by middle school engineering teachers, the program engages students in hands-on STEM projects. NSF funded the development of curricular materials and supplies at all four middle schools.
     
  • Middle School Advisory: NSF funds went to develop and pilot a program at Brown Middle School aimed to improve students’ sense of safety and connection to adults in school.
     
  • Generation Citizen: Newton eighth graders are learning to be civic activists through Generation Citizen a hands-on educational initiative that teaches middle and high school students how to affect meaningful change in their communities by taking civic action. Newton Schools Foundation funded the successful pilot in two Day Middle School social studies classes in Spring 2016 and provided additional funding for the program’s roll-out this year to alleighth grade social studies classes at Day.

High School

  • Da Vinci Program, piloted this year at Newton South High School, fosters students’ intrinsic motivation for exploring the interconnectedness of science, technology, engineering, art, and math (STEAM). Through its project-based curriculum and distinctive design, the program builds students’ skills in experimentation, problem solving, collaboration, communication, and artistic representation. Students enter the program as sophomores and remain with a small cohort throughout high school.
     
  • The Calculus Project is designed to increase the number of low-income African American and Hispanic American students who enroll in and successfully complete calculus in high school. An ambitious effort to narrow the achievement gap in mathematics, the program is comprised of summer enrichment courses and school-year support for students beginning in 7th grade.  It is modeled after a similar and very successful initiative in Brookline. Additional NSF funding will enable the program to expand into the high schools.
     
  • Science and Society is a new senior interdisciplinary science and history elective at Newton North High School. Through a series of case studies—including the development of the atomic bomb, DNA and how it connects to identity and medical innovation, germ theory and the development of public health, biological evolution, environmental history, the development of modern cities, and the science of race— the course illuminates how science has changed and responded to society over time. Students read primary source documents and historical narratives, hold discussions and debates, and undertake research to learn about the interconnection between science and the evolution of our modern world.